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Saline Wetlands (Estuarine) Vegetation

Estuarine Reedland - Estuarine Swamp Oak Forest - Estuarine Mangrove Forest - Estuarine Saltmarsh

Saline wetlands occur on mudflats where there is high tidal influence, evaporation and fresh water accumulation. Mangroves, saltmarsh and other estuarine vegetation provide a filter for solids and liquids that would otherwise pollute marine habitats vital for juvenile species and breeding grounds. Pollution, sedimentation and habitat clearing pose a big threat to estuarine communities, which in turn impacts the water quality of the Lane Cover River and Parramatta River.

Estuarine Reedland

Estuarine Reedland is listed as an endangered ecological community under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. Threats to this community include changes to the tides and sea levels, stormwater run off introducing nutrients and other pollutants.

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Estuarine Swamp Oak Forest

An endangered ecological community listing Estuarine Swamp Oak Forest is determined for how often and for how long it is in water and the level of salinity in the ground water.

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Estuarine Mangrove Forest

Numerous mangroves forming low closed to open forest on mudflats along the harbour, river coves and estuaries in Sydney. There are two mangrove species found in this forest type. The Grey Mangrove and the River Mangrove.

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Estuarine Saltmarsh

Estuarine Saltmarsh is listed as an endangered ecological community under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. You can usually find this vegetation community behind mangroves in tidal areas and are made up of salt-tolerant grasses, herbs, reeds, rushes and sedges which provide food and habitat for fish, birds, insects and spiders.

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Last updated on 1 September 2017